Why Can’t We Make Saving Fun?

Saving money. We all know we should be doing it for retirement and have money tucked away for a rainy day.  But it is harder said than done.

The reality is, if you don’t pay yourself first, you will end up paying yourself last and there won’t be anything left!

But saving money just isn’t as much fun as spending it.  Saving money for retirement is just too far away when you are in your 20’s or 30’s, having the newest and latest piece of technology is much more exciting.

Gerry Mitchel in his recent article for The Meridian Star  ‘The Psychology of Saving’ makes some very interesting points. Here is a snippet. Continue reading

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3 Things to Improve Your Money Happiness

money happiness

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“l’ll be happy when I get the pay rise” or “I’ll be happy when I get a ………”  Just insert whatever the word is for you.

Why do so many of us wait to be happy?  What is wrong with being happy right now?  And, why do we look to money to make us happy? Continue reading

The Have’s and Have Nots – The gap is growing.

Wow, what an eye opener. I have just watched Nigel Latta:  The new Have’s and Have Nots.  What a powerful documentary about the changes in the New Zealand economy, the impact on families and the widening gap between the have’s and have nots.

shutterstock_78856468I highly recommend that you watch the documentary, but if you can’t spare 44 minutes, then these are the key points that I picked up from it.

We have a new ‘class’ in New Zealand, The Working Poor.  These are the families where both parents work full time, and still don’t have enough money to meet the day to day needs of their families.

If something goes wrong and they need to borrow money; say for car repairs or a family funeral that is out of town, they have no option but to borrow money.  The banks won’t lend it to them, so they end up in the hands of the loan shops, who will happily lend them money at 10% interest.  That didn’t sound too bad until it was clarified; that was 10% per week!!  When you are desperate you tend to think in terms of  immediate needs, and don’t calculate the longer term costs so the situation just keeps getting worse.

The statistics are scary.  One in five families don’t have enough to live on.  One in three families couldn’t survive more than two weeks if the main breadwinner lost their jobs. A staggering 55% would run out of money in four weeks. Continue reading