Keeping Up With the Joneses

keeping up with the Joneses

Conspicuous spending or Keeping up with the Joneses and using money as a status symbol, used to be thought of as the prerogative of the rich and famous. Well not anymore.

Why do we feel the need to be keeping up with the Joneses?  We see it frequently with clients, “We couldn’t possibly cancel the holiday, it simply wouldn’t look good.”

So what!  What is more important looking good or staying afloat financially?  Well, it seems for many people, it is looking good in the eyes of others. Continue reading

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Gender Roles are Alive and Well When it Comes to Money!

gender roles

It’s your first date, you have had a lovely meal and the bill arrives. What happens next?

According to a survey by Nerdwallet in 2014 (1,000 respondents in the USA who are in a relationship) 77.4% believe that the man should pick up the tab.  It looks as though traditional gender roles when it comes to money are alive.

Both men and women think this, but men are a little more likely to think this way. Continue reading

3 Things to Improve Your Money Happiness

money happiness

Candidsnapphotography.com

“l’ll be happy when I get the pay rise” or “I’ll be happy when I get a ………”  Just insert whatever the word is for you.

Why do so many of us wait to be happy?  What is wrong with being happy right now?  And, why do we look to money to make us happy? Continue reading

Three Critical Rules of Money Management

coins_2Happy New Year!  We hope that you have had a fantastic time over the Christmas/New Year period and enjoyed a least a few days off.

It’s (late) January, a time for reflection about last year and looking ahead at self-improvement for this year.  Once you have worked through the diet and exercise goals (they always seem to be fairly near the top of my list), there’s the money planning for the year.

Here are the Three Critical Rules of Money Management that you need to incorporate into your planning.

Continue reading

What does wealth mean to you?

Typically in our society wealth is equated with how much money we have.  Wealth can mean different things to different people and what it means to you comes down to your core values.

key to wealthAs a money mentor I love to listen and learn from as many different experts and  differing perspectives about money as I can.  So it was with eager anticipation that I attended Dr John Demartini’s recent talk on wealth in Auckland.

I wasn’t disappointed, it was fascinating. I could really relate to what he was saying.  It isn’t just about changing your money behaviours, you need to go much deeper than that and explore your beliefs and core values.

When you ask a room full of people how many of them want to be financially free most of the room put their hand up.  When you ask the same room to put their hand up if they are financially free, very few do.  Why is this? Continue reading

When it comes to money 1+1 doesn’t necessarily =2

Why?  Because of the emotions and meanings we attach to money.

 

Money, Colorful words hang on rope by wooden peg

Money is still a Taboo subject.  In 1913 Sigmund Freud wrote, “money questions will be treated by cultured people in the same manner as sexual matters, with the same inconsistency, prudishness and hypocrisy.”

I think his observation is still applicable today. Look at this NY Times article

Lynda Moore   http://www.mymoneyseeker.com

Think like a travel agent when setting your goals

Our bags are packed and we are all set to go.  After months of waiting we are on our way to Sydney to attend Brendon Burchard’s Experts Academy.

20140706_063817 (800x611)We knew where we wanted to go, the date we were leaving and how we were going to get there; so planning for this trip was really quite easy.

Other times when we travel, we are more fluid.  We have a departure date and a date we need to be home and what happens in the middle is totally flexible.  So we decide what to do on a day to day basis.

Goal setting is like that, sometimes you have a short sharp goal that you just need to get stuck in and achieve.  Maybe saving for that unexpected large dentist bill or setting up your emergency fund.

Your goal may go something like this “I want $1,000 in a savings account for emergencies in 90 days from today”.  That ticks all the boxes in terms of being a clear, measurable and attainable goal.

But if you are 25 and you have a goal to have enough money to retire on when you are 65, you will need a bit more flexibility in your planning, by turning your large goal into smaller measurable and attainable chunks.

So, when you are setting your goals.  Think like a travel agent

  1. Where are you now?
  1.  Where do you want to go?
  1. How are you going to get there?
  1. When do you want to arrive?

We love to hear from you, so please leave us a comment or to learn more about our programmes, feel free to  contact us. 

Lynda Moore    www.mymoneyseeker.com