Spring Clean your Finances

I woke up this morning with the urge to clean!  No, I don’t mean the usual push the vacuum cleaner round; do a bit of dusting clean.  I mean the empty the cupboards out, see what is lurking in the back of the pantry and have a good old decluttering session.

20140928_102029Maybe it has something to do with spring; the trees are just starting to blossom and the garden is coming back to life after winter.  So the urge is there to get ready for summer.  Or maybe I am just sick and tired of opening a cupboard and all this ‘stuff’ that I don’t use or need stares back at me and it is time to do something about it.

That got me thinking, we should also spring clean our finances on a regular basis as well.  Have a look at all the automatic payments and direct debits that come out of your bank account.

Do you know what they are for?

Do you still want the service you are paying for?

It is also a good opportunity to review other expenses like your insurances, phone and power provider to see if there are any deals you could capitalise on.

What about your credit card?  If you have a balance just sitting there that won’t go away, are there any options by changing credit card company that could help reduce the cost.

Don’t forget to look at your savings, when was the last time you increased your contribution to your savings plan?  If you got rid of a couple of unused subscriptions, you could divert the money to savings instead.

Oh well, it’s back to the kitchen cupboards for me…..

If you would like some help decluttering your finances, feel free to drop us an email or give us a call

 

5 tips to help you cope with Money and Depression

Robin_WilliamsIt was with surprise and sadness that we learned of the death of Robin Williams.  How could someone who gave so much to everyone else not realise that he was loved in return?  The answer of course was that insidious illness, Depression.

Then I saw this headline in the NZ Herald “Williams was depressed and broke”.  It was only a few months earlier that Charlotte Dawson also suffering from depression and ‘jobless and penniless’ ended her life as well.  It seems that depression and money problems are a dangerous combination.

I don’t know the details of either’s financial circumstances other than what has been in the media.  But both had been in the situation of earning very good incomes during their careers, they enjoyed the good things in life and were able to be generous to their friends and family.  Then for whatever reason the money stopped flowing and life became even more difficult when combined with depression. Continue reading

What does wealth mean to you?

Typically in our society wealth is equated with how much money we have.  Wealth can mean different things to different people and what it means to you comes down to your core values.

key to wealthAs a money mentor I love to listen and learn from as many different experts and  differing perspectives about money as I can.  So it was with eager anticipation that I attended Dr John Demartini’s recent talk on wealth in Auckland.

I wasn’t disappointed, it was fascinating. I could really relate to what he was saying.  It isn’t just about changing your money behaviours, you need to go much deeper than that and explore your beliefs and core values.

When you ask a room full of people how many of them want to be financially free most of the room put their hand up.  When you ask the same room to put their hand up if they are financially free, very few do.  Why is this? Continue reading

The Have’s and Have Nots – The gap is growing.

Wow, what an eye opener. I have just watched Nigel Latta:  The new Have’s and Have Nots.  What a powerful documentary about the changes in the New Zealand economy, the impact on families and the widening gap between the have’s and have nots.

shutterstock_78856468I highly recommend that you watch the documentary, but if you can’t spare 44 minutes, then these are the key points that I picked up from it.

We have a new ‘class’ in New Zealand, The Working Poor.  These are the families where both parents work full time, and still don’t have enough money to meet the day to day needs of their families.

If something goes wrong and they need to borrow money; say for car repairs or a family funeral that is out of town, they have no option but to borrow money.  The banks won’t lend it to them, so they end up in the hands of the loan shops, who will happily lend them money at 10% interest.  That didn’t sound too bad until it was clarified; that was 10% per week!!  When you are desperate you tend to think in terms of  immediate needs, and don’t calculate the longer term costs so the situation just keeps getting worse.

The statistics are scary.  One in five families don’t have enough to live on.  One in three families couldn’t survive more than two weeks if the main breadwinner lost their jobs. A staggering 55% would run out of money in four weeks. Continue reading

Will you have enough money when you want to retire?

A scary question isn’t it.  I meet quite a number of people who don’t want to even think about retiring let alone thinking if they will have enough money when they finally do want to retire.

The answer to the question was the subject of a presentation at a network breakfast I attended.  A certified financial planner used a case study to illustrate the point.

Retirement planning (1024x637)We probably all know this.  We are living longer.  But maybe we hadn’t quite connected the dots in terms of having enough money to retire on.  It wasn’t that long ago that the life expectancy after retirement at age 65 was only 9 years.  Now it can easily be 20 to 30 years, so the number of people potentially outliving their capital is going to be quite significant.

The website My Longevity has gathered data to help you work out your life expectancy based on your lifestyle rather than actuarial data.  It is worth spending a few minutes to complete the questionnaire to see what your life expectancy could possibly be.  I did mine and unless I get hit by a bus, I potentially will need my capital to last until I am 106!!  I certainly don’t have enough to last that long. Continue reading

I’ll be happy when…..

“l’ll be happy when I get the pay rise” or “I’ll be happy when I get a ………”  Just insert whatever the word is for you.  Why do so many of us wait to be happy.  What is wrong with being happy right now?

20140711_063455_LLSDo you know this song?

“If you’re happy and you know, it clap your hands.
If you’re happy and you know, it clap your hands
If you’re happy and you know it and you really want to show it,
If you’re happy and you know it can your hands.”

I think it is about  time we started clapping our hands, instead of looking outside of ourselves and waiting until we have more stuff to make us happy.

We need to stop, take a deep breath, look around and see where we are right now and take pride in our accomplishments to date.

I am not saying there is anything wrong in wanting more things, a nicer house, flash car, but our happiness shouldn’t be delayed until you have them.

So, go for a walk in the park, watch the sunrise.  Tell your partner or children that you love them, start looking inside yourself rather than externally for your happiness.

If you don’t feel happy right now, then every day when you wake up think of one thing you are grateful for, as the list grows, so will your happiness.

If you want to be a little crazy then sing the song and just start clapping.

We love feedback, so please feel free to leave us a comment or contact us.

Lynda Moore   http://www.mymoneyseeker.com

 

 

When it comes to money 1+1 doesn’t necessarily =2

Why?  Because of the emotions and meanings we attach to money.

 

Money, Colorful words hang on rope by wooden peg

Money is still a Taboo subject.  In 1913 Sigmund Freud wrote, “money questions will be treated by cultured people in the same manner as sexual matters, with the same inconsistency, prudishness and hypocrisy.”

I think his observation is still applicable today. Look at this NY Times article

Lynda Moore   http://www.mymoneyseeker.com